One of the things sobriety has given me

So my little dog Kenny Boy had to get stitches this week. I worked Saturday night and so Sunday I planned to sleep all day, because I had to go right back to work in the evening. However, my wife woke me with that “wife voice” that something is truly wrong. I love the way she is assertive I might add. She said, “You need to get up,” oppose to asking. I can respect that though, it meant something is very, very wrong.

Poor Kenny Boy!
Poor Kenny Boy!

Well it turns out Kenny Boy was bitten on the back by Manu, our lab mix. They were playing outside and Manu went up to the fence to bark at our neighbor and Kenny Boy came up from behind and Manu snapped at him causing two punctures. So I got up and took Kenny Boy to vet with my daughter. My wife was actually working at the time (she works from home) and could not take Kenny Boy herself.

So I took her bank card. We both were not sure how much it would be, but both loving our pets we were prepared to pay what it took. I felt bad though, not having a savings for this type of thing. But I knew this was or should be my responsibility. I remembered the time when I was in addiction and our dog Colt got injured, my wife had to come over to the vet and pay the $300 bill because I could not.

However with Kenny Boy, they did offer a credit line if I was approved. So I gave it a shot, so maybe my wife would not have to pay, and I was approved. So it made me feel better that even though I could not pay the $500 bill for Kenny Boy’s stitches, at least I got the credit and can pay it off monthly. And that’s something my recovery and sobriety has given me. Credit.

So a few quick things:

I have a new article out on my Keepingitsober.org site called Dear Pam: A letter to the wives, I wrote this so maybe our loved ones and gain a little understanding of why we do, what we do!

Next I created a closed FB group called, Keeping it Sober-Addiction, Recovery & Living Sober, so we can post and talk more freely while saving our anonymity. So go check it out!

Last, I created a new survey, only 3 questions, so you can help me, help create better content for you!

Thanks,

Jaime-keeping it Sober

 

The Very First Sentence Of Your Journey

So let’s have some fun today. Everyone has an amazing story to share. And if your like me, you have often thought of publishing your personal journey if nothing else but to help others. So, if you got “the call” and a check advancement was on the way for “your story” what would be your very, very first ever sentence to your amazing book?

5 things to help you stay sober…

Five things that helped me stay sober in early sobriety:

One of the challenging parts of our journey in recovery is when we find ourselves “days in” sobriety. Our bodies and minds are in a physical and mental shock. We have a tornado of thoughts and emotions spinning off in our mind pushing us to take some type of action. Anything to make the unfamiliar reality we find ourselves in just go away. At this point we usually pick up and use or drink. However here are five things that I did (out of the many!) that helped me “hold on” in early sobriety.

1. Journal, which is blogging the old fashion way
2. Make the decision, not to make any decisions.
3. Do nothing. For the first time in your life, do nothing and “hold on.”
4. Stay off the phone and social media, (except for this blog!).
5. Priorities. This actually should be first on the list.

For an added bonus, here’s five more!

1. Don’t picture your life without drugs and alcohol, just picture your life.
2. Go to some type of support group, even if it kills you!
3. Make a commitment to change, because that what it’s all about!
4. Pick one person to be accountable too, preferably not your dealer!
5. Have a plan, if you don’t prepare, then you prepare to fail!

This is really good stuff! Look out later this week as I start to break down all ten things that helped me stay sober with personal stories from my own recovery!

Keeping it sober,

j

Keeping a journal in early sobriety can be used as a great tool later on!
Keeping a journal in early sobriety can be used as a great tool later on!